Social Media in the Real Estate Industry

The real estate industry is all about people. Whether you’re a developer working to find an investor or a leasing agent trying to reach potential tenants during lease-up, real estate professionals are all looking to make the personal connections that are vital to success in the industry.

Social media in an incredible tool for reaching the people who drive the real estate industry. NAIOP Massachusetts, in partnership with communications firm Solomon McCown & Company, surveyed more than 100 real estate professionals in June 2015 on how they use social media for their business. How do architects, construction professionals, brokers, developers and professionals in all aspects of the business use digital communication tools? Here are the key takeaways from our survey.

LinkedIn is the most popular social media platform for real estate professionals (Tweet this!), with 52.3 percent of those polled saying they use it. Facebook was a distant second place, with 20 percent of professionals saying they use the world’s largest social media network.

Only 6.5 percent of those surveyed said they don’t use social media for personal or professional use. (Tweet this!) It’s clear that professionals in all areas of the industry are active on social channels.

81 percent of professionals in the real estate industry access social media networks on mobile devices. (Tweet this!)

Social media isn’t just used by young professionals. (Tweet this!) While nearly 81 percent of 21-30 year olds in our survey say they use social media both personally and professionally, 66.7 percent of 61-70 year olds also use digital communication tools.

100 percent of real estate brokers surveyed believe social media helps them to do their jobs. (Tweet this!) The only differentiation is to what degree social media is helpful: 61.9 percent of brokers consider social media to be very helpful, while 38.1% consider it somewhat helpful.

89 percent of brokers surveyed have found new leads through social media. (Tweet this!) No wonder 100 percent of brokers say that social media helps them in their professional lives!

One-third of real estate owners say they only use social media a few times a year. (Tweet this!) A scant 22 percent of owners say they understand social media enough to do it in-house at their companies. (What a missed opportunity!)

How do professionals measure success? In our poll, 65 percent of respondents said that engagement with their target audience was the most important goal for their social media campaign. Sourcing new leads was the primary indicator of success for 26 percent of those surveyed.

Take a deep dive into the data unearthed by the NAIOP/Solomon McCown survey in the infographic below.

SMC-NAIOP_SocialMediaRE-infographic

The Changing Face of Downtown Boston

The following blog post was submitted by Ally Quinby, Account Executive at Solomon McCown.

Real estate professionals gathered last week to discuss the significant transformation happening in our city’s core. The office, retail and residential sectors are all growing and working together to create a true 24/7, live, work, play environment in downtown Boston.

Even with the boom in the Seaport, Downtown is seeing an influx of new office tenants who want to be in the heart of the city. David Greaney of Synergy Investments told us that of the 70 leases his firm has completed this year, 59 of them were located downtown. And these tenants are looking at more than just the office space. Mark Smith said that Equity includes the amenities of the surrounding area on tours with potential tenants. He also told the room that tenants want comfortable, communicative environments.

All these companies have employees who want to be within walking distance of work. Despite the thousands of apartment units that are planned and currently being constructed, Bill McLaughlin of AvalonBay Communities said that the demand is there because young people aspire to live in the city; we are well-positioned to absorb the deliveries we will see in the next five to six years.

Retail is growing too. Andrea Matteson of CBRE/Grossman Retail Advisors highlighted Walgreens, Equinox, Scholars and the coming Legal Seafoods as game changers who have helped Downtown Crossing look better than ever. She said that first floor tenants are key in providing character for downtown buildings.

Foreign investment and continued development make Boston one of the U.S.’s most dynamic cities, and our panelists agreed that downtown is going to be an integral part of Boston’s growth in the coming years.

2013 Bus Tour Recap: The Suburban Transformation

The following blog post was submitted by David Fleming, Principal at PACE Communications Group, a marketing and PR firm that specializes in commercial real estate and retail.Elisif_20130501_0150

Three signs that spring has finally arrived in Boston: 1) green grass on the Esplanade, 2) the Red Sox back at Fenway Park, and 3) NAIOP MA’s Annual Bus Tour. The 11th edition of the tour took place on Wednesday as more than 250 people aboard five buses toured properties along what is suddenly one of the hottest stretches in commercial real estate in the region: the Route 128 Corridor from Needham to Lynnfield. Here’s a summary:

Elisif_20130501_0115Kickoff at Needham Crossing

  • Needham’s Economic Development Director Devra Bailin, discussed efforts to rebrand the former New England Business Center as Needham Crossing
  • Justin Krebs and Mark Roopenian described two of Normandy Real Estate Partners’ projects along the route:
    • Center 128, which will redevelop Needham’s former New England Business Center into an 825,000-square-foot “super-park,” including a Marriott Residence Inn Hotel
    • Station at Riverside, which will transform MBTA’s Riverside Station into a mixed-use development featuring 295 apartments, a 10-story 225,000 square foot office building, and a 20,000 square foot retail village
    • Mike Wilcox of The Bulfinch Companies discussed development at Needham Crossing and the branding and leasing efforts at Atrium Center. Wilcox concluded with an exciting Atrium Center video that you can see here.
    • In his market overview, Jeremy Grossman of CBRE/Grossman Retail Advisors noted the “flight to quality” among retailers, New Urbanism, the continued expansion of restaurants, the intensifying battle among grocers, and the strengthening of regional markets such as Chestnut Hill, Lynnfield, and Northborough as key trends

Elisif_20130501_0215Bus Tour Highlights

Six tour buses, escorted by members of the MA State Police, traveled along Route 128 beginning in the Needham/Newton area and ending in Lynnfield. Here are a few highlights:

 

Elisif_20130501_0268Lunch and Learn at MarketStreet Lynnfield

The tour stopped in Lynnfield for lunch at MarketStreet Lynnfield, a 680,000 square foot mixed-use development currently under construction. Inside a space that will become a Shoe Market store, WS Development’s Tom DeSimone and National Development’s Ted Tye shared details of the joint venture scheduled to open in August 2013.

When complete, MarketStreet Lynnfield will include 395,000 square feet of shops and restaurants, 80,000 square feet of office space, 180 residential apartments known as Arborpoint at MarketStreet, and the 9-hole King Rail Reserve golf course.

Elisif_20130501_0282Voices on Tour

I caught up with a few people on tour. Here’s what they had to say:

  • Tom DeSimone, partner, WS Development: “There’s no better way to understand real estate than to actually be there. The NAIOP Bus Tour gets you closer to the real estate by providing an introduction. Then you can go back and look at whatever may have peaked your interest.”
  • Ted Tye, managing partner, National Development: “It’s great to people out here having a nice day, getting out from behind their desks, and seeing some projects that are being built. And, it’s incredible that in 2013 that we actually have things being built.”
  • David Chilinski, co-founder and president, PCA: “The best part of the NAIOP Bus Tour is that you really get a sense of what’s happening and, importantly, what’s new in the marketplace.  We all know the tried and true properties, but the tour lets you see new projects as well as cases where people are reinventing or adding to projects. That’s the importance of this tour.”
  • Sarah Walker Weatherbee, managing director, Keller Augusta: “You get a sense of history as well as what the future holds for the Boston-area markets like the ones we saw today. And, the networking that the Bus Tour enables is unique to NAIOP—that really makes the day exceptional.”


While here, please read David’s important post below about National Development’s Roseann Sdoia, who was seriously injured in the Boston Marathon bombings. David includes a link to
Roseann’s Recovery Fund for those who wish to donate toward expenses for Roseann’s treatment and recovery.

Grim Optimism for Real Estate and the Economy

Goodwin Procter’s Real Estate Capital Markets Conference was recently held in New York City in partnership with Columbia Business School.  GP-REConferenceAn exceptional group of speakers discussed the real estate markets, investments, and the economy.

The keynote presentation was delivered by Austan Goolsbee, former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, and now a Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. Goolsbee spoke with “grim optimism” about the US economy.  The US has the most productive work force in the world and low energy and new-energy sources will benefit our growth.  Relative to the rest of the world, our fiscal imbalance is manageable. All in all, he believes that the next six to twelve months will be a bumpy ride, but prospects in the long-run look good.

The following are a few interesting observations made during the panel discussions:

  • Demographics are playing a key role internationally, especially in the US. Effects of this will be seen in an increased demand for apartments, senior housing, and retail.
  • With accounting standards likely to change in the future, as relating to corporate leasing and ownership, more businesses will likely choose owning large amounts of their space.
  • Retail sales continue to be impacted by online competition, but retail is still a growing market. The future may move towards more hybrids that have both online and storefront locations.
  • Office space needs are dropping in terms of space requirements per new job. However, there is a sense that over time businesses will start to swing back towards a need for greater space.
  • Multifamily housing rents are back to pre-recession highs and it is likely that rents will experience slower growth going forward.
  • Record amounts of capital were raised both in the public and private markets last year. With less growth worldwide, real estate is very attractive to investors.  Investor interest is focused on yields and risk management. Where in the past, “cash is king”, now, “cash flow is king”.
  • Rates should not be rising in the short term, but that is a big risk for all asset classes. The markets could wake up to a starting spike in rates that, in hindsight, will have seemed inevitable.

Strategies for Today and Predictions for Tomorrow

The following blog post was submitted by Ally Quinby, Account Executive at Solomon McCown.

NAIOP Massachusetts’ Smart Money in Real Estate event, on September 19, gathered together a distinguished panel of Boston’s real estate professionals to discuss the state of today’s market, as well as their predictions for the future.

To set the table for the event, NAIOP MA disseminated a poll to members regarding their current perceptions and future predictions. Doug Poutasse, Executive Vice President, Head of Strategy and Research at Bentall Kennedy, and moderator of the panel, leveraged the results from the poll during the discussion.

In regards to real estate investment, Jeff Furber, CEO of AEW Capital Management, listed the four qualities investors are seeking currently: Safety, Income, Control and Liquidity. Tier 1 core costal markets like Boston have been a major beneficiary of this fact due to the lack of risk associated with investing in stable regions.

Similarly, Jon Davis, CEO of The Davis Companies, believes there are many value-add opportunities in healthier cities, “Here in Boston, we are transforming neighborhoods. Take Kendall Square and the Fort Point Channel; there is so much vibrancy in these areas.”

According to one panelist, what the Boston area is lacking is supply of retail space. Despite the recent buzz around grocery-anchored retail centers, Tom DeSimone, Executive Vice President of WS Development, believes centers like this are “overplayed” and the increase in food sold outside grocery stores across the country, in retail shops like Wal-Mart, will be a problem in the future. In agreement, Mark Weld, Managing Director of Clarion Partners, said, “Distressed debt is aggregating in grocery-anchored retail centers across the country that people thought were on the path to growth.”

Looking forward, all the panelists agreed the looming effects of sequestration raise many questions for real estate professionals across the country. Despite the increased activity seen in markets like Boston, New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., uncertainty of this type has its effects. According to Jon Davis, “cleaning up from sequestration is the single biggest risk” we are facing today. There is no indication of whether or not Congress is going to be able to come together.

General sentiment among the panelists regarding the economic future was mild, noting there will not likely be significant improvement or dramatic decline in the state of the market.  Instead, all panelists agreed success today—and in the future—will rely heavily on partnering with the right people for leverage. Especially in times like these, what matters is one’s character and ability to execute.

NAIOP Raises $151,500 for Heading Home

This post was submitted by Marc Margulies, principal at Margulies Perruzzi Architects and president of Heading Home’s Board of Directors

On June 6th, NAIOP Massachusetts held its 24th Annual Charitable Golf Tournament to benefit Heading Home, raising $151,500 to support programs to end homelessness in Greater Boston. This record-breaking sum is the largest in the tournament’s history, bringing the total donated to Heading Home to more than $1.85 million. The commercial real estate community should be proud
that its steadfast commitment to Heading Home reaps real rewards for homeless families.

In 2011, Heading Home helped more than 2,000 homeless people in Greater Boston by providing them a place to call home and opportunities for self-sufficiency. Two-hundred and fifty units of housing have been created since 2006, with 61 new units created in the past year alone.  More than 400 volunteers annually commit their time and energy to Heading Home, and the commercial real estate community provides a large number of those volunteers. The monies raised by NAIOP will continue to support Heading Home’s programs to end homelessness locally.

Andrew Hoar, president of CB Richard Ellis/New England and chair of the 2012 NAIOP Massachusetts Charitable Events Committee, led the effort to make this record-breaking donation possible. Andy has been on the Heading Home Board of Directors since 2007, and he, his wife, and his firm are longtime contributors to the organization. Andy’s efforts this year hit the fundraising goals out of the park!

Another ardent Heading Home supporter who deserves special recognition is NAIOP Massachusetts CEO, David Begelfer. David has been actively involved in the struggle to end homelessness for more than 24 years, and started the annual NAIOP golf tournament to support Heading Home. In 2010, David received the Bob Ray Partnership Award from the Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance for his commitment to ending homelessness. His support of Heading Home, including serving on the organization’s Advisory Council, has been unwavering through the years.

Since the first NAIOP Golf Tournament that raised $5,000 for Heading Home, the commercial real estate industry has continued to come together to show support for homeless families and individuals. Thank you to NAIOP’s member volunteers, staff, and generous donors who helped to raise this record-breaking donation for Heading Home. It is only through their support that the tournament is able to raise funds needed to help Heading Home accomplish its goal of ending family homelessness.

View pictures from the event.

Breaking Ground in Back Bay

The following blog post was submitted by Sheridan Wachtel, Marketing Assistant at Solomon McCown.

On May 31, experts from all sides of the real estate industry joined us at the Sheraton Hotel to discuss one of Boston’s most iconic and sought-after neighborhoods, the Back Bay. The program, “Breaking Ground in Back Bay,” discussed the future opportunities for retail, residential, office and hotel in the neighborhood that has been the epicenter of the city for decades.

The panel included Peter Meade, Director of the Boston Redevelopment Authority; Michael Jammen, Principal, UrbanMeritage, LLC; David Martel, Executive Director of Cushman & Wakefield of Massachusetts, Inc.; Michael Roberts, Vice President Development of AvalonBay Communities, Inc.; Jeffrey Saunders, President of Saunders Hotel Group, LLC; and was moderated by Leggat McCall Properties LLC Executive Vice President, Mahmood Malihi.
Meade set the table for the discussion citing the pipeline of projects slated for the Back Bay including the redevelopment of the Christian Science Plaza, 888 Boylston, Chanel’s new retail store, and Copley Place residential building—which will be the tallest building in the Back Bay once completed.

Jammen, one of the architects of the Newbury Line Program, discussed the “red hot” retail scene in the Back Bay and more specifically, Newbury Street. “Constrained by being only eight blocks in length, retail real estate on Newbury street is seeing more demand than supply,” said Jammen in light of the fact that the street’s architecture isn’t traditionally window-display friendly. “It doesn’t have the windows like Rodeo Drive and other luxury retail streets of the world…but no one is going to build another Newbury street anytime soon,” said Jammen.

Having represented some of Boston’s most notable office spaces including The Hancock Tower, Martel discussed the increasing value of Back Bay’s office properties. “We have seen a quantum shift in office space demand in the Back Bay since 2008,” said Martel explaining how the coveted 24/7 lifestyle of the neighborhood is an increasingly important factor to office tenants to attract and retain talent—a factor that sets it apart from both contemporary urban areas like the Seaport and traditional office space properties like the Financial District and suburban areas.

With a growing desire to work in the Back Bay, residential real estate in the area has only increased in value. Roberts commented on the demographic shift that has made residential real estate in the Back Bay boom. “Young professionals landing a majority of newly created jobs, along with empty nesters wishing to return to city-livingare the key demographics in residential real estate in this area,” said Roberts.

And, according to Roberts, residents of the Back Bay aren’t planning to move out of the Back Bay anytime soon, citing residential properties in the neighborhood see half the turnover rate than all other neighborhoods in their portfolio.

Rounding out the panel was long-time hotelier Saunders, who discussed the resiliency of hotel occupancy in Boston’s Back Bay despite the influx of new hotels in Boston’s Seaport district. “Back Bay continues to be ground zero for people who want to visit the city,” said Saunders whose hotels operate at 90+ percent occupancy rate in the summer months and projecting 2012 to yield its highest occupancy rates in recent years.

With a full spectrum of real estate development projects underway and even more projected in 2013 and 2014, real estate in the Back Bay will continue to be hot commodity and a place where residents, tenants, tourists and developers want to be.

Watch a video of the panelists, or view photos from the event.