Senate Energy Bill to Require Home Energy Audits & Labeling

Tomorrow the Senate will be voting on its version of an energy bill that passed the House in early June. The bill includes a new requirement that single family homes, multifamily properties with less than 5 units, and condominiums must undergo an energy audit prior to the property being listed for sale. The results of the audit would need to be disclosed when the property is listed. The bill also requires the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) to establish a home energy rating and labeling system, which would be based on, but not limited to, a property’s energy consumption, energy costs, and greenhouse gas emissions. The property’s energy rating and label would also need to be disclosed. In addition, DOER would track and publicly report the number of home energy audits conducted and energy ratings and labels issued.

NAIOP has serious concerns with the impact this could have on the housing market, particularly in low-income communities where homeowners may not have the means to make upgrades and properties would be potentially devalued with a low score/label. NAIOP supports the Mass Save program and believes that incentives, not penalties, will do more to address energy efficiency in the Commonwealth.

A number of concerning amendments to the bill have also been filed. Amendment #8 is the climate change legislation that was passed by the Senate earlier this year. NAIOP is strongly opposed to this language due to the confusing and vague language it contains and the substantial adverse impact it would have on development. It would require all “commonwealth certificates, licenses, permits, authorizations, grants, financial obligations, projects, plans, actions, and approvals for any proposed projects, uses, or activities in and by the commonwealth” to be consistent “to the maximum extent practicable “with a yet to be developed climate plan. Clearly, this language could delay and potentially halt countless public and private projects.

Amendment #68 would mandate electric vehicle charging stations. NAIOP does not believe the building code is the right place to advance the growth of specific technologies or sectors of the economy.

Following the Senate’s vote, the bill will go to conference committee where members will have to agree to compromise language. That version of the bill would then need to go back to the House and Senate for a vote before the end of the session on July 31.

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